Monthly Archives: March 2009

A Pinch of Salt

From JH:

Loved ones who were recently in Zihuatanejo brought JB and I this bag of sea salt, harvested from nearby Laguna de Las Salinas. What I love most about this sel is that it’s mild, so I can use it liberally for texture as much as taste, without having to worry about cutting my tongue (or jacking-up my blood pressure). And, I love the graphic pouch that it comes in, with its tiny ceramic spoon. A perfect gift (and from what I gather with minimal internet searching, it probably costs about $5)…

zihua sea salt

zihua sea salt

p.s. If anyone out there happens across a place to purchase this salt, or any other salt from Zihua, in the States––do let us know!

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Filed under Cooking Chronicles, Gift Ideas

Wallfood

From JH:

I’m fairly obsessed with the “Potager” wallpaper from Brunschwig & Fils. It’s so gorgeously organic and pared down. Here it is in Tomato Soup:

"potager" in tomato soup

"potager" in tomato soup

Just enjoy it for a little while longer, in Banana this time:

"potager" in banana

"potager" in banana

(p.s. it also comes in Black and White, Robins Egg, Almond, and Mint and Chocolate, yum).

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Filed under Raw Materials

They’re Alive!

From JH:

The Parrot Tulips that I bought at GRDN this weekend have awoken!

 

parrot tulips

parrot tulips

It’s very Little Shop of Horrors, if you ask me.

 

"feed me, seymour."

"feed me, seymour."

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Filed under Gardening

Plant Care

From JH:

Every 3-4 months I re-plant my favorite rubber tree in new soil, and wipe its leaves with a bit of baby oil––this not only makes the leaves look glossy and clean, it’s also moisturizing, which makes my tree happy. And when my tree is happy, I’m happy. See, she’s glowing!

 

my rubber tree

my rubber tree

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Filed under Simple Syrup

Spring Awakening

From JH:

These are the seeds that JB and I are going to sew for our spring/summer garden. They were purchased at GRDN (my favorite garden and flower shop in Boerum Hill), along with a bag of Seed Starter (potting soil), and two germinating kits. Stay tuned for more posts on our garden’s progress…

lettuce, pepper, and tomato seeds

lettuce, pepper, herbs, and tomato seeds

Note: If you’re thinking about sewing your own seeds this spring, I recommend purchasing them from The Seed Savers Exchange, a non-profit group of gardeners dedicated to the preservation of heirloom seeds. SSE does a lot of other great community gardening work, too. You can order straight from their website, or through their catalogue, which has the prettiest cover of any catalogue I’ve ever seen:

Seed Savers Exchange catalogue

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Filed under Do It Yourself, Gardening, The Growth of a Garden

Mari Balls

From JH:

mari balls as curtain ties

mari balls as curtain ties

Last winter I discovered Japanese Mari balls at Tortoise General Store in Los Angeles. I think I probably visit TGS every time I go home to LA. I also think I buy a new Mari ball every time I go there. Lately, I’ve been using mine as curtain ties in my dressing room (it’s true, I have a dressing room, and it is my absolute FAVORITE place to be in the mornings and at the end of the day; it is total BLISS). But the Mari balls:

 

mari balls, detail

mari balls, detail

More:

more mari

more mari

Are they not amazing! Each one is made by hand using colored thread, embroidered around a cotton core. You can make them yourself, there’s a book on how to do it: Japanese Temari: A Colorful Spin on an Ancient Craft by Barbara B. Suess. Or you can buy them ($30/ball) at TGS’s online store: Mari Balls at TGS. I’m fairly obsessed…thinking they would be beautiful strung across a room, over a dinner table, too…

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Filed under Gift Ideas, Simple Syrup

Book Club

 From JH:

textiles: woolman and mcgowan

textiles: woolman and mcgowan

 

In true JB style, my boyfriend returned from a weekend trip to Austin with a gift. Was I surprised? Not really––JB almost always brings something back with him when goes away––usually food, anything from artichokes to small batch jams. But check this gift out: Textiles: A Handbook for the Student and the Consumer by Mary Schenck Woolman and Ellen Beers McGowan, two Household-Teachings Professors at Columbia University. So special (and who knew Columbia once offered classes in Household-Teachings)! Published in 1926, this book is not only gorgeous (and heavy––the paper stock is like a glossy magazine’s), but it’s so useful. Chapters include: Power Weaving and Design, The Cotton Industry, Silk…Laundry! A little book with a lot of thought. Thank you, JB!

 

chapter II: "carding and spinning"

chapter II: "carding and spinning"

chapter IV: "power weaving and design"

chapter IV: "power weaving and design"

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Filed under Simple Syrup